Pregnancy and domestic plane travel: what you need to know

pregnancy and domestic plane travel tips

Taking to the skies with baby on board? Lucky you! Whether it be for a babymoon or business, there are a host of things you need to know before doing any domestic (or international) plane travel when pregnant.

Each airline has its own set of rules detailing when you need medical clearance to fly, and you also need to make sure you take care of you and your precious cargo while you’re flying.

If you’re flying within Australia, you need to be familiar with the rules your airline of choice has in place for pregnant passengers. Here’s what you need to know.

pregnancy and domestic plane travel tips

QANTAS

The main point you need to remember is that if you’re flying with QANTAS after the 28-week pregnancy mark, you’ll need to have a certificate or letter from a registered medical practitioner or midwife that confirms:

  • Your estimated date of delivery
  • If you’re pregnant with one baby or multiples
  • That your pregnancy is routine with no complications

If you do have pregnancy complications, you will need medical clearance to fly.

Qantas pregnancy and domestic plane travel tips

Make sure you check the latest advice on flying while pregnant with QANTAS here.


Jetstar

After 28 weeks, you’ll need to carry a certificate or letter from a registered doctor or midwife, and it can’t be dated any earlier than 10 days before your flight. It has to state:

  • Your approximate due date
  • Whether it’s a single or multiple pregnancy
  • That your pregnancy is complication-free

If you do have pregnancy complications, you’ll need medical clearance.

Jetstar pregnancy and domestic plane travel tips

Extra travel notes:

Jetstar says that once you’re in your third trimester, you can’t sit in an exit row seat on any of its aircraft. This is because passengers in those seats may need to operate the heavy exit door in an emergency.

Check the latest travel advice on flying with Jetstar while pregnant here.


Virgin Australia

Flying with Virgin Australia at 28 weeks pregnant or more will mean you’ll have to have a letter from your doctor or midwife that’s dated no more than 10 days before your flight, stating:

  • Your estimated due date
  • If you’re having one or more babies
  • Your pregnancy is complication-free
  • That you’re fit to fly for the length of the flight you have booked

Virgin Australia says it will consider each pregnancy and relevant medical conditions on a case by case basis.

virgin Australia pregnancy and domestic plane travel tips

Make sure you check the latest advice on flying with Virgin while pregnant here.


Tigerair

Here’s a summary of flying with Tigerair when pregnant. Medical certificates from doctors have to be dated 10 days or less than your flight date and include:

  • Your estimated due date
  • If you’re having a single or multiple pregnancy
  • That your pregnancy is complication-free
  • You are fit to fly for the flights you are booked.

short haul pregnancy and domestic plane travel tipslong haul pregnancy and domestic plane travel tips

Make sure you check the latest advice on flying with Tigerair while pregnant here.


 Staying safe in the air

expert advice pregnancy and domestic plane travel tips

Obstetrician gynaecologist Dr Charlotte Elder says pregnant women need to make sure they drink plenty of water when flying, and move around during the flight.

“In part that’s because the risk of deep vein thrombosis is higher in pregnant women and air travel will increase that risk as well,” Dr Elder explained to Mum’s Grapevine.

“Some people can also find that they get uncomfortable swelling when they’re in the air, so compression stockings are quite a useful thing to wear.”

She also says to be prepared with the necessary paperwork, in case you need medical attention at your destination.

“Make sure you’ve got a summary of your pregnancy that you’re taking with you, and information about test results or about your medical history so that if you do need to seek care while you’re away, you’ve got something with you.”

The most important step is to discuss your pregnancy plane travel plans with your doctor or midwife, so they can help you make informed choices.

Here are more useful tips for travelling while pregnant. Safe travels!

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